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Wyoming Agate

Wyoming Agate, also known as Wyoming Iris Agate, is usually found near the Wind River. In fact, they're also known as “Wind River Iris Agate." Most of these gems are composed of well-petrified wood limbs, which are casts completely, where the wood has been replaced by chalcedony within a produced water-line agate.

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Some of the stone's layers are described as a solid into semi-opaque, while others are virtually in a water-clear form. The locale is situated along the Bighorn Canyon in Montana, just along the Wyoming border. The area is quite isolated and even today, mostly unsettled.

Historically, much of the area was utilized by Native Americans, who utilized the cliffs to force deceive into their deaths. As being part of their hunting custom, the tribe of this is stacked up along their heads, then bleach under the sun. These paved the way for its distinctiveness compared with other stones.

These agates must be considered like some sedimentary agates, as they were encased with traces of an ancient seabed. In fact, the nodules are typically comparable with concrete, and it is believed that, with other concrete structures, these nodules are sometimes compromised with evidence of fossilized remains.

Wyoming agates are also characterized by extensive, rich-colored bands and a fine-banding shadow effect. In addition, these bands provide several colors such as pink, white, orange, yellow, blue, and purple (that can be perceived.)

Often, this crystal rotates with its unique banding, quite comparable to smoky quartz and amethyst. In contrast to the significant colors in its banding, the surface matrix of the nodule, illustrated as jasper, conveys a rich, purple-tinted tone. The outer matrix of this gem is quite soft compared to other agates.

The stones were usually established with thin beds of nodules, typically not more than a few feet deep.

Most of them were dug from several claims within the area, dating back to 1900. At the same time, several claims were presented in the area, although no profitable mining operations ever materialized. In addition, concealed contracts have run out, and most of the owners have not agreed to further mining activity. In fact, no commercial bustle is well-known for the planning phases. Some of these limb casts include botryoidal quartz as well as agate quartz crystals within.

Looking for iridescence is quite challenging, but some well-experienced lapidary craftsmen will have providence with perseverance.

This is also a unique stone with a mesmerizing history. Some of its multi-colored varieties were vastly treasured by early natives, both for personal embellishment as well as, effective articles.

Nowadays, even if it is found in abundance all over the world or considered one of the least exclusive stone materials, it enjoys a broader recognition than ever before. The stone has a seemingly endless range, with several patterns and color distributions for which chalcedony transpires.

These agates are well-established, and more likely to be unrestrained or fractured, or else you can perceive verification of cracks that have healed. A lot of people could even call them the finest and qualitative agate. This also presents some abundant evidence with highly unpredictable, geochemical settings of environments.

These micro-environments most likely contributed significantly to the restricted typical form of such agate. Similar hydraulic standards also apply, with a much smaller physical level, over the period of time. If you look at a photo of a typical clear agate, you will observe zones of direction for these crystals.

It usually corresponds to the banding aspects, though the banding may not be noticeable to the eye. These banding attributes are possibly the effect of the regular, depositional method that composed such agate. This heterogeneity simply means that water may comprise a chosen direction of movement through the porosity attributes.

As an outcome, water will not be identical and consistent throughout this stone. It will tend to be inclined by the surface of some porosity features. It is originated from substituted plant matter such as limb casts or from fulfilling other spaces along the sub-surface.

Most Wyoming agate tends to have a preferred form once it was originally produced. Nowadays, several agates particularly have small sizes into a potted form, which is something closer to the original one. Meanwhile, other agates are visibly broken down from a bigger, creative stone.

Also, Wyoming agate can be illustrated as having interrelated void spaces, which are composed of cracks or fractures within the rock. Some of the well-experienced Agate collectors find some ways to keep away from hammering these types of rocks in order to avoid any physical damage as much as possible.

In fact, the perfect way to appraise Wyoming agate is through a tough light. These specimens may also display their physical core, as well. In addition, this is the most exceptional agate, which has a logical setting with unique bands, small trees, and other different shapes.

In addition, it is also considered as an unrestricted rock, which is eye-catching for making jewelry compared with the other stone that can be easily fractured or broken. Furthermore, Wyoming agate and other fascinating quartz crystals can be found all throughout Wyoming’s mineral locations.

Most of the time, travelers from different states can benefit from taking a break in nature to search for nature’s different stones. Some well-experienced geologists and professional souvenir hunters definitely adore what Wyoming rock has to offer. Furthermore, several varieties of chalcedony and quartz have been found in Wyoming.

Moreover, most of this crystalline quartz is characterized as being an overcast and transparent mineral. Still, specimens of chalcedony are relatively wide-ranging, and in fact, Wyoming Agate, become the most preferred collecting piece, particularly for collectors of jasper, agate, flint, and petrified wood.

Most of the time, chalcedony of these deposits comprises several agates near Guernsey located in Hartville from eastern Wyoming. Several agates in such areas have become new agate varieties. For instance, one common local agate is known as Youngite.

In fact, it forms unique limestone breccias, composed of pink-to-cream-tone breccia clasts that are refined, and smooth by light-grey into grey-blue banded quartz and chalcedony. However, another popular agate has also originated from the region, known as the Slater agate.

These agates have produced concretionary coatings with white coatings. Once cut, the inside of these stones is naturally a dark-grey to black agate surrounding opaque, agatized interiors with tiny, excellently agatized dendrites. In fact, the surface of this agate is permeable, giving an intuition for a fossilized sponge.

In addition, there are some striking specimens of chalcedony that were established in Wyoming. The list includes quartz, petrified wood, and chalcedonies, which can be found in the Sierra Madre, Laramie, Shirley, Seminoe Mountains, Laramie, and Saratoga Valleys in the southern part of Wyoming.

The most ordinary forms of chalcedony in such areas such as agates and jaspers gnarled from Paleozoic limestones, predominantly, known as the Casper structure. On the other hand, several kinds of petrified wood from this area most likely originated from silica leached from Tertiary volcanic ash falls, which later substituted the wood.

In addition to, along the Lake located in the Sierra Madre Mountains, some quartz crystals transpire with cavities, and fractures in a red granite. This state is also well-known for copper mining, and several considerable minerals such as nickel, zinc, gold, platinum, and palladium.

Along the Black Hills of Wyoming, several amethyst and chalcedony stones have been found. Agates and jasperoids are also reported within stream gravels, with the stones consisting of gold colors found along the Black Buttes east of Sundance. This becomes visible to be associated with Tertiary alkalic volcanic rocks.

In the River Basin, west of the Black Hills, wide ranges of petrified wood, chert, and jasper are also been found. The jasper and chert are typically connected with Paleozoic limestones from the western border of the basin, while the petrified wood was originated from the Wasatch Formation area of the said state.

Some impressive, large-diameter bases and logs are also found. From the eastern part of Buffalo, a poorly silicified, breakable wood has been found, which can easily disintegrate into tiny pieces that are not appropriate for refining. Another petrified wood is known as the Crazy Woman Creek wood, which is quite suitable for lapidary.

This wood is silicified and hooped in several tones such as white and brown, which can be found along terrace gravels from 60 up to 120 feet above the Crazy Woman Creek. It is also extended along the Bighorn Mountains where Dry Creek unites with the Crazy Woman Creek.

Moreover, massive pieces (approximately 1 foot in extent) could be found in the locality of Crazy Woman Creek in the past years. This can be useful for landscaping, and there are local, different collections in Buffalo. In fact, similar material has also been found in the terrace gravels near the Powder River (Kaycee.)

In Eastern Buffalo, amethyst-lined cavities were also reported with some samples of petrified wood. Some of them can be found in Wyoming, in the area known as Blue Forest in the Eden Valley. This wood has a black-into-brown core, enclosed with clear blue chalcedony, which produces a distinctive and eye-catching silicified wood.

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