Chrysocolla Chalcedony Gem: Properties, Meanings & Prices

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Chrysocolla chalcedony is a vibrant blue to green variety of the gemstone chalcedony. It’s often called “gem silica” and is highly prized by collectors and jewelry lovers alike.

Although chrysocolla is soft, it has a gorgeous bright blue to green color. Chalcedony is more durable but often paler. Chrysocolla chalcedony is the best of both worlds!

Chrysocolla chalcedony is known for being the most valuable variety of chalcedony. Why? It’s quite rare — only a few places produce good amounts — and chrysocolla chalcedony’s bright blue to green hues are the rarest color of chalcedony.

Today, we’ll go over all of chrysocolla chalcedony’s meanings, traits, prices, and more!

chrysocolla chalcedony gemstone

What Is Chrysocolla Chalcedony?

Chrysocolla chalcedony is a semi-precious gemstone with bright blue to green coloring. The stone’s name comes from its composition: microcrystalline quartz (chalcedony) colored by the presence of chrysocolla.

Other names for chrysocolla chalcedony are:

  • Chrysocolla-in-chalcedony

  • Gem silica

  • Gem silica chrysocolla

  • Gem chrysocolla

  • Chrysocolla in quartz

By far, the most common nickname for chrysocolla chalcedony is “gem silica.”

With a resemblance to aquamarine and blue zircon, chrysocolla chalcedony can be an alternative March birthstone or December birthstone, respectively.

Since it contains chrysocolla, the gem is also lucky for Taurus, Virgo, and Aquarius.

But what is the difference between chrysocolla and chrysocolla chalcedony? The differences come down to their mineral traits.

botryoidal chrysocolla chalcedony gem silica specimenPictured above: Crust of botryoidal, translucent, lustrous, opalescent green chalcedony formed over bright green chrysocolla from Arizona, USA; Comes with pre-1940 label from dealer Lazard Cahn | Image credit: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Chrysocolla Chalcedony Specifications & Characteristics

Chrysocolla chalcedony is primarily chalcedony, a type of microcrystalline quartz. All quartz stones are composed of silica, meaning silicon dioxide (SiO2), hence the name “gem silica.”

“Microcrystalline” means the crystals are too small to be seen without magnification. Most stones called “quartz” like rose quartz and amethyst are macrocrystalline, with clearly identifiable crystals.

The stone contains chrysocolla, a substance composed of copper, hydrogen, oxygen, and silica, as a mixture or as inclusions. Whether chrysocolla is a mineral or mineraloid is debated.

The International Mineralogical Association (IMA) has approved chrysocolla as a mineral with the formula (Cu2-xAlx)H2-xSi2O5(OH)4·nH2O.

However, a 2006 Stanford study proposed that chrysocolla — with the stated formula (Cu,Al)2H2Si2O5(OH)4 • nH2O — could actually be a microscopic combination of the copper hydroxide mineral spertiniite, amorphous (non-crystalline) silica, and water. Other mineralogists claim chrysocolla is a hardened silica gel.

Regardless, chrysocolla chalcedony is a mineral found in various stunning shapes, like:

  • Botryoidal (resembling bunches of grapes)

  • Stalactic (resembling stalactites), often in geodes

  • Nodular (rounded structure with radial crystal arrangement inside, sometimes with circular banding)

You can also find chrysocolla covered with macrocrystalline quartz druzy, but this is different from chrysocolla chalcedony.

Another similar material is chrysocolla opal. Opal is similarly composed of silica (and water) but it’s not crystalline like chalcedony.

Chrysocolla chalcedony properties listed:

  • Mohs hardness: 6.5 to 7

  • Color: Blue, bluish-green, greenish-blue, green

  • Crystal structure: Hexagonal

  • Luster: Vitreous (glassy), sub-vitreous, or resinous

  • Transparency: Transparent to opaque; Often uneven

  • Refractive index: 1.540-1.553

  • Density: 2.55-2.91

  • Cleavage: None

  • Fracture: Conchoidal, subconchoidal, or granular

  • Streak: White

  • Luminescence: Fluorescence sometimes present in chalcedony - light green, yellow, or orange in LW-UV; Green, light yellow, or tan in SW-UV

  • Pleochroism: None

  • Birefringence: 0.004-0.009

  • Dispersion: None

chrysocolla chalcedony gem silica cabochon ring

Chrysocolla Chalcedony History

Both chrysocolla and chalcedony go back to ancient times.

The name “chrysocolla” dates back to 315 BC, when Theophrastus coined it from the Ancient Greek terms khrusós meaning “gold” and kolla, meaning “glue” because metallurgists used chrysocolla and similar minerals to solder gold.

French mineralogist André-Jean-François-Marie Brochant de Villiers brought the name “chrysocolla” back in 1808.

The name “chalcedony” was used by ancient Roman scholar Pliny the Elder in 75 AD for translucent jaspers. Chalcedony tools go back to 30,000 BC.

Chrysocolla was approved as a mineral by the IMA in 1980. The approval was a “special procedure” because the IMA had redefined “bisbeeite” as chrysocolla in 1977.

Bisbeeite vs Chrysocolla

Bisbeeite was discovered in Bisbee, Arizona, USA, in 1915. American mineralogist Waldemar Theodore Schaller named it bisbeeite. However, Arizona specimens described in 1922 were found to actually be cyanotrichite in 1923.

Mineralogists in 1930 and 1942 proposed that bisbeeite was actually a type of plancheite or chrysocolla, respectively. Studies on African bisbeeite found that specimens were a blend of plancheite and chrysocolla or a legitimate, distinct species.

Impurities in bisbeeite specimens, along with further studies on “bisbeeite” material from the original Arizona mine, have led many to believe it’s a distinct mineral species that shouldn’t be discredited. But it’s not an official mineral yet.

rough glossy chrysocolla chalcedony gem silica speicmenPictured above: Rough chrysocolla chalcedony specimen

Chrysocolla Chalcedony Healing Properties

As a predominantly blue healing stone, chrysocolla chalcedony’s meaning reflects that of other blue gemstones, representing tranquility, honesty, and intuition. This gem can be used as a heart, throat, or third eye chakra stone.

Physical Healing

Physically, chrysocolla chalcedony is believed to treat issues related to:

  • Menstrual pain

  • Pregnancy stress

  • Hormone regulation

  • Circulation

  • Digestion

  • Immune system function

  • Eyesight

Emotional Healing

Emotionally, crystal healers recommend chrysocolla chalcedony crystals for:

  • Lowering negative feelings like stress, anxiety, guilt, or anger

  • Clearing the mind

  • Encouraging self-reflection

  • Promoting confidence

  • Facilitating healthy communication

  • Bringing inner peace

chrysocolla chalcedony gem silica gemstone cabochonPictured above: Chrysocolla chalcedony cabochon

Chrysocolla Chalcedony Gemstone Properties

Besides rarity, chrysocolla chalcedony’s value also depends on color, cut, clarity, transparency, and carat weight.

Color

Chrysocolla is known for its color, and silicification with chalcedony only enhances it. The copper in chrysocolla gives chrysocolla chalcedony its greenish-blue hues, similar to turquoise. Higher amounts of chrysocolla can result in greener specimens.

The stone may have uneven coloring. The best specimens are usually evenly colored, highly saturated, and predominantly blue.

Note to buyers: watch out for pictures of chrysocolla chalcedony in water — this can make the gemstone’s color seem brighter than it actually is.

Cut

Most chrysocolla chalcedony is cut into cabochons, which can vary in cost based on color, transparency, and cut quality. Another common cut is chrysocolla chalcedony beads.

Some material is faceted, which is rare and even more valuable. Pear, oval, and fancy cuts are common.

Attractive specimens may be sold rough (uncut).

Clarity & Transparency

Clarity describes the degree of visible inclusions in a gem, which can lower its transparency and value. Chrysocolla can be a visible inclusion in chalcedony, but it’s better if the stone is a mixture with the chrysocolla disseminated as microscopic particles.

Many specimens have uneven translucence and some have brown or black matrix inclusions (from the rock it formed in). Native copper inclusions have also been found in chrysocolla chalcedony.

The best chrysocolla chalcedony stones are translucent to transparent, or at least uniformly translucent, with no visible inclusions.

Carat Weight & Size

Surprisingly, chrysocolla chalcedony comes in somewhat large sizes for its rarity:

  • Faceted Gems: 2 to 25 carats, usually under 20 cts

  • Cabochons: 2 to 20 carats, usually under 15 cts

  • Rough: Up to 300 carats

Quality usually decreases in larger specimens, though.

Treatments & Simulants

A large part of chrysocolla chalcedony’s value is that its beautiful appearance is natural, meaning not the result of treatments.

The steep prices and rarity of high-quality chrysocolla chalcedony has led to many simulants — different stones that resemble chrysocolla chalcedony naturally or via treatments.

Some chrysocolla chalcedony simulants are:

  • Greenish-blue artificial glass (sometimes colored by copper additive)

  • Dyed chalcedony (sometimes labeled “Peruvian chalcedony”)

  • Chrysoprase

Chrysoprase is another chalcedony variety that’s more common and resembles chrysocolla chalcedony but less attractive.

brazilian chrysocolla chalcedony rough specimenPictured above: Rough chrysocolla chalcedony specimen from Brazil

Chrysocolla Chalcedony Formation & Sources

Part of chrysocolla chalcedony’s rarity is its unique formation conditions. Chrysocolla forms when copper minerals are oxidized, and chalcedony comes in when water containing dissolved silica comes through.

As such, this stone is only found near small copper deposits.

Mining Locations

Chrysocolla chalcedony has only been found in a few places, many of which have since been depleted. Currently, the top source is Arizona (USA), specifically the Miami-Inspiration Mine.

Other chrysocolla chalcedony sources worth noting are:

  • Indonesia

  • Iran/Armenia area

  • Mexico

  • Namibia

  • New Mexico, USA

  • Peru

  • Philippines

  • Spain

  • Taiwan

Taiwan is also known for producing some of the highest quality chrysocolla chalcedony, though it’s scarce. The scarcity of local material and popularity of chrysocolla chalcedony among Taiwanese buyers has raised its prices there significantly.

Speaking of prices…

chrysocolla chalcedony cabochon ringPictured above: Silver ring with chrysocolla chalcedony cabochon

Chrysocolla Chalcedony Price & Value

Prices of chrysocolla chalcedony for sale are expectedly higher than other chalcedony varieties, which are generally quite affordable, typically only reaching $15 per carat.

Faceted chrysocolla chalcedony price per carat ranges start around $25 and reach up to $175 per carat. (Beyond your budget? High-quality faceted chrysoprase gems are usually $2 to $12 per carat!)

Cabochons range in price, starting from $20 to $30 per carat and reaching $150 to $450 per carat for top-quality specimens in large sizes.

Rough chrysocolla chalcedony can reach over $280 per ounce ($10 per gram or $2 per carat) for good-quality pieces. Overall, rough gem silica is usually around $0.80 to $1.50 per carat.

Average prices for gem silica jewelry:

  • Rings: $200 to $800

  • Necklaces: $80 to $800

  • Cuff Bracelets: $150 to $650

  • Beaded Bracelets: $100 to 550

Chrysocolla Chalcedony Care and Maintenance

Last up: gemstone care. Natural chrysocolla chalcedony is easy to care for. You may want protective settings on rings, but you’ll be okay without them.

Clean the stone with warm water, mild soap, and a soft toothbrush.

The stone has a low toxicity risk due to copper and silica, but its fairly high hardness means you’re unlikely to breathe in the dust (from fibers scratched off) that would cause any illnesses.

top quality chrysocolla chalcedony rough specimenPictured above: High-quality, facet-grade chrysocolla chalcedony specimen| Image credit: Dave Ault, Flickr, CC-BY-SA-2.0

Cultivate Your Collection with Chrysocolla Chalcedony!

Chrysocolla chalcedony’s high value is warranted: with vibrant oceanic colors, alluring rarity, and unique formations, this stone is truly unique. It’s usually sold in specialty shops, but we have plenty of gorgeous chrysocolla chalcedony to choose from!

Buy chrysocolla chalcedony gemstones today!

Chrysocolla chalcedony is a vibrant blue to green variety of the gemstone chalcedony. It’s often called “gem silica” and is highly prized by collectors and jewelry lovers alike.

Although chrysocolla is soft, it has a gorgeous bright blue to green color. Chalcedony is more durable but often paler. Chrysocolla chalcedony is the best of both worlds!

Chrysocolla chalcedony is known for being the most valuable variety of chalcedony. Why? It’s quite rare — only a few places produce good amounts — and chrysocolla chalcedony’s bright blue to green hues are the rarest color of chalcedony.

Today, we’ll go over all of chrysocolla chalcedony’s meanings, traits, prices, and more!

chrysocolla chalcedony gemstone

What Is Chrysocolla Chalcedony?

Chrysocolla chalcedony is a semi-precious gemstone with bright blue to green coloring. The stone’s name comes from its composition: microcrystalline quartz (chalcedony) colored by the presence of chrysocolla.

Other names for chrysocolla chalcedony are:

  • Chrysocolla-in-chalcedony

  • Gem silica

  • Gem silica chrysocolla

  • Gem chrysocolla

  • Chrysocolla in quartz

By far, the most common nickname for chrysocolla chalcedony is “gem silica.”

With a resemblance to aquamarine and blue zircon, chrysocolla chalcedony can be an alternative March birthstone or December birthstone, respectively.

Since it contains chrysocolla, the gem is also lucky for Taurus, Virgo, and Aquarius.

But what is the difference between chrysocolla and chrysocolla chalcedony? The differences come down to their mineral traits.

botryoidal chrysocolla chalcedony gem silica specimenPictured above: Crust of botryoidal, translucent, lustrous, opalescent green chalcedony formed over bright green chrysocolla from Arizona, USA; Comes with pre-1940 label from dealer Lazard Cahn | Image credit: Rob Lavinsky, iRocks.com – CC-BY-SA-3.0

Chrysocolla Chalcedony Specifications & Characteristics

Chrysocolla chalcedony is primarily chalcedony, a type of microcrystalline quartz. All quartz stones are composed of silica, meaning silicon dioxide (SiO2), hence the name “gem silica.”

“Microcrystalline” means the crystals are too small to be seen without magnification. Most stones called “quartz” like rose quartz and amethyst are macrocrystalline, with clearly identifiable crystals.

The stone contains chrysocolla, a substance composed of copper, hydrogen, oxygen, and silica, as a mixture or as inclusions. Whether chrysocolla is a mineral or mineraloid is debated.

The International Mineralogical Association (IMA) has approved chrysocolla as a mineral with the formula (Cu2-xAlx)H2-xSi2O5(OH)4·nH2O.

However, a 2006 Stanford study proposed that chrysocolla — with the stated formula (Cu,Al)2H2Si2O5(OH)4 • nH2O — could actually be a microscopic combination of the copper hydroxide mineral spertiniite, amorphous (non-crystalline) silica, and water. Other mineralogists claim chrysocolla is a hardened silica gel.

Regardless, chrysocolla chalcedony is a mineral found in various stunning shapes, like:

  • Botryoidal (resembling bunches of grapes)

  • Stalactic (resembling stalactites), often in geodes

  • Nodular (rounded structure with radial crystal arrangement inside, sometimes with circular banding)

You can also find chrysocolla covered with macrocrystalline quartz druzy, but this is different from chrysocolla chalcedony.

Another similar material is chrysocolla opal. Opal is similarly composed of silica (and water) but it’s not crystalline like chalcedony.

Chrysocolla chalcedony properties listed:

  • Mohs hardness: 6.5 to 7

  • Color: Blue, bluish-green, greenish-blue, green

  • Crystal structure: Hexagonal

  • Luster: Vitreous (glassy), sub-vitreous, or resinous

  • Transparency: Transparent to opaque; Often uneven

  • Refractive index: 1.540-1.553

  • Density: 2.55-2.91

  • Cleavage: None

  • Fracture: Conchoidal, subconchoidal, or granular

  • Streak: White

  • Luminescence: Fluorescence sometimes present in chalcedony - light green, yellow, or orange in LW-UV; Green, light yellow, or tan in SW-UV

  • Pleochroism: None

  • Birefringence: 0.004-0.009

  • Dispersion: None

chrysocolla chalcedony gem silica cabochon ring

Chrysocolla Chalcedony History

Both chrysocolla and chalcedony go back to ancient times.

The name “chrysocolla” dates back to 315 BC, when Theophrastus coined it from the Ancient Greek terms khrusós meaning “gold” and kolla, meaning “glue” because metallurgists used chrysocolla and similar minerals to solder gold.

French mineralogist André-Jean-François-Marie Brochant de Villiers brought the name “chrysocolla” back in 1808.

The name “chalcedony” was used by ancient Roman scholar Pliny the Elder in 75 AD for translucent jaspers. Chalcedony tools go back to 30,000 BC.

Chrysocolla was approved as a mineral by the IMA in 1980. The approval was a “special procedure” because the IMA had redefined “bisbeeite” as chrysocolla in 1977.

Bisbeeite vs Chrysocolla

Bisbeeite was discovered in Bisbee, Arizona, USA, in 1915. American mineralogist Waldemar Theodore Schaller named it bisbeeite. However, Arizona specimens described in 1922 were found to actually be cyanotrichite in 1923.

Mineralogists in 1930 and 1942 proposed that bisbeeite was actually a type of plancheite or chrysocolla, respectively. Studies on African bisbeeite found that specimens were a blend of plancheite and chrysocolla or a legitimate, distinct species.

Impurities in bisbeeite specimens, along with further studies on “bisbeeite” material from the original Arizona mine, have led many to believe it’s a distinct mineral species that shouldn’t be discredited. But it’s not an official mineral yet.

rough glossy chrysocolla chalcedony gem silica speicmenPictured above: Rough chrysocolla chalcedony specimen

Chrysocolla Chalcedony Healing Properties

As a predominantly blue healing stone, chrysocolla chalcedony’s meaning reflects that of other blue gemstones, representing tranquility, honesty, and intuition. This gem can be used as a heart, throat, or third eye chakra stone.

Physical Healing

Physically, chrysocolla chalcedony is believed to treat issues related to:

  • Menstrual pain

  • Pregnancy stress

  • Hormone regulation

  • Circulation

  • Digestion

  • Immune system function

  • Eyesight

Emotional Healing

Emotionally, crystal healers recommend chrysocolla chalcedony crystals for:

  • Lowering negative feelings like stress, anxiety, guilt, or anger

  • Clearing the mind

  • Encouraging self-reflection

  • Promoting confidence

  • Facilitating healthy communication

  • Bringing inner peace

chrysocolla chalcedony gem silica gemstone cabochonPictured above: Chrysocolla chalcedony cabochon

Chrysocolla Chalcedony Gemstone Properties

Besides rarity, chrysocolla chalcedony’s value also depends on color, cut, clarity, transparency, and carat weight.

Color

Chrysocolla is known for its color, and silicification with chalcedony only enhances it. The copper in chrysocolla gives chrysocolla chalcedony its greenish-blue hues, similar to turquoise. Higher amounts of chrysocolla can result in greener specimens.

The stone may have uneven coloring. The best specimens are usually evenly colored, highly saturated, and predominantly blue.

Note to buyers: watch out for pictures of chrysocolla chalcedony in water — this can make the gemstone’s color seem brighter than it actually is.

Cut

Most chrysocolla chalcedony is cut into cabochons, which can vary in cost based on color, transparency, and cut quality. Another common cut is chrysocolla chalcedony beads.

Some material is faceted, which is rare and even more valuable. Pear, oval, and fancy cuts are common.

Attractive specimens may be sold rough (uncut).

Clarity & Transparency

Clarity describes the degree of visible inclusions in a gem, which can lower its transparency and value. Chrysocolla can be a visible inclusion in chalcedony, but it’s better if the stone is a mixture with the chrysocolla disseminated as microscopic particles.

Many specimens have uneven translucence and some have brown or black matrix inclusions (from the rock it formed in). Native copper inclusions have also been found in chrysocolla chalcedony.

The best chrysocolla chalcedony stones are translucent to transparent, or at least uniformly translucent, with no visible inclusions.

Carat Weight & Size

Surprisingly, chrysocolla chalcedony comes in somewhat large sizes for its rarity:

  • Faceted Gems: 2 to 25 carats, usually under 20 cts

  • Cabochons: 2 to 20 carats, usually under 15 cts

  • Rough: Up to 300 carats

Quality usually decreases in larger specimens, though.

Treatments & Simulants

A large part of chrysocolla chalcedony’s value is that its beautiful appearance is natural, meaning not the result of treatments.

The steep prices and rarity of high-quality chrysocolla chalcedony has led to many simulants — different stones that resemble chrysocolla chalcedony naturally or via treatments.

Some chrysocolla chalcedony simulants are:

  • Greenish-blue artificial glass (sometimes colored by copper additive)

  • Dyed chalcedony (sometimes labeled “Peruvian chalcedony”)

  • Chrysoprase

Chrysoprase is another chalcedony variety that’s more common and resembles chrysocolla chalcedony but less attractive.

brazilian chrysocolla chalcedony rough specimenPictured above: Rough chrysocolla chalcedony specimen from Brazil

Chrysocolla Chalcedony Formation & Sources

Part of chrysocolla chalcedony’s rarity is its unique formation conditions. Chrysocolla forms when copper minerals are oxidized, and chalcedony comes in when water containing dissolved silica comes through.

As such, this stone is only found near small copper deposits.

Mining Locations

Chrysocolla chalcedony has only been found in a few places, many of which have since been depleted. Currently, the top source is Arizona (USA), specifically the Miami-Inspiration Mine.

Other chrysocolla chalcedony sources worth noting are:

  • Indonesia

  • Iran/Armenia area

  • Mexico

  • Namibia

  • New Mexico, USA

  • Peru

  • Philippines

  • Spain

  • Taiwan

Taiwan is also known for producing some of the highest quality chrysocolla chalcedony, though it’s scarce. The scarcity of local material and popularity of chrysocolla chalcedony among Taiwanese buyers has raised its prices there significantly.

Speaking of prices…

chrysocolla chalcedony cabochon ringPictured above: Silver ring with chrysocolla chalcedony cabochon

Chrysocolla Chalcedony Price & Value

Prices of chrysocolla chalcedony for sale are expectedly higher than other chalcedony varieties, which are generally quite affordable, typically only reaching $15 per carat.

Faceted chrysocolla chalcedony price per carat ranges start around $25 and reach up to $175 per carat. (Beyond your budget? High-quality faceted chrysoprase gems are usually $2 to $12 per carat!)

Cabochons range in price, starting from $20 to $30 per carat and reaching $150 to $450 per carat for top-quality specimens in large sizes.

Rough chrysocolla chalcedony can reach over $280 per ounce ($10 per gram or $2 per carat) for good-quality pieces. Overall, rough gem silica is usually around $0.80 to $1.50 per carat.

Average prices for gem silica jewelry:

  • Rings: $200 to $800

  • Necklaces: $80 to $800

  • Cuff Bracelets: $150 to $650

  • Beaded Bracelets: $100 to 550

Chrysocolla Chalcedony Care and Maintenance

Last up: gemstone care. Natural chrysocolla chalcedony is easy to care for. You may want protective settings on rings, but you’ll be okay without them.

Clean the stone with warm water, mild soap, and a soft toothbrush.

The stone has a low toxicity risk due to copper and silica, but its fairly high hardness means you’re unlikely to breathe in the dust (from fibers scratched off) that would cause any illnesses.

top quality chrysocolla chalcedony rough specimenPictured above: High-quality, facet-grade chrysocolla chalcedony specimen| Image credit: Dave Ault, Flickr, CC-BY-SA-2.0

Cultivate Your Collection with Chrysocolla Chalcedony!

Chrysocolla chalcedony’s high value is warranted: with vibrant oceanic colors, alluring rarity, and unique formations, this stone is truly unique. It’s usually sold in specialty shops, but we have plenty of gorgeous chrysocolla chalcedony to choose from!

Buy chrysocolla chalcedony gemstones today!

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